RunKeto.com - We are Running on Ketones. This is not a typical story; we are endurance athletes at different stages of our lives, who are experimenting with a low carb Ketogenic diet. We are not doctors or scientists, just athletes. Anthony is the youngest and the fastest, age 20, and prefers ultra road running. Eric (ZoomZoom), age 27, is ukulele playing mixed distance runner. Dan (SKA Runner), age 42, is new to running, prefers mountains ultras, and a bit of a computer geek. Bob(uglyrnrboy), age 54, prefers mountains ultras and loves to tele ski. This site, www.RunKeto.com, will document our journey as endurance athletes implementing a low carb ketogenic diet in to our lives. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you have about our experiences.

What is a Nutritional Ketosis Diet? []

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. This elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood is a state known as ketosis.

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Ask us a Question . . . []

QUESTION OF THE DAY: Ketosis and Pre-Race Fueling

QUESTION  OF THE DAY: from Dave . . .

Hey guys, great website! I am 4 weeks into a low-carb diet and an ultrarunner and things are going great. I have a 100 miler in June and am at a loss on how to fuel. What do I do in the days prior? The morning of? I am too used to carbo-loading. What do I eat during the race? How often? I know everyone is different, but I need a baseline from which to start. Thanks!


Hey Dave, GREAT Question.  I have been thinking about this a lot since I am only 93 days into Ketosis and I have not run an ultra yet while under the influence.  I have been experimenting with 5k –10K fueling, but those are not very taxing.  During my long runs, I generally just fast, so a racing environment is going to be totally different.   In terms of carb-loading, you could have confused me with cookie monster   . . .  OMG I was a mess; I total carb addict.  I laugh at what I was eating.  AND during my guaranteed to bonk Ultra_Running_Fuelingraces, I did the ‘recommended ‘ 250+ calories per hour.  I even set my alarm to remind me to eat every half hour. 

With that said, I will leave the question for Anthony, Eric, or anyone else who want to chime in.  I will report back how my first race goes, Trail Running Festival 50 miler, which is in April and then I will have another 50 miler, Quad Rock, in May. 

Keep us up to date with your training.  ~SKA

6 comments:

  1. Here is what I do: I eat as I normally eat. Nothing special for the days prior a race or the morning of the race.

    I always start with a large brekafast with salad, olive oil, cheese, nuts and eggs. This is about 90% fat. It is generally good for an entire 50K and a good start for a 100 miler. I had no problem following this for 1 1/2 years now, about 15 x 50Ks, one 50 miler and one 100 miler.

    If I travel out of town, I pack my own lunch using chopped boiled eggs and cheese/nuts over salad and I add the olive oil before eating.

    During the race I eat whatever I feel like, including fruit, potatoe chips, etc. No sugar, but I might have a cup of gatorade or two.

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  2. Dave,
    See my new post on the subject!
    Eric

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  3. I will have a post with every detail of how I run the 50k this weekend. Look for my post next Thursday for a full answer to your questions.
    The cliffnotes version is this: make sure to hit 50 grams of carb the day before (or for marathon and 50k you can actually do a mini carb load if using Vespa), then eat a small and safe breakfast with some protein and MCTs more than an hour and a half before the race. Hit some Vespa 40 mins out. Then carb as desired in small doses (maybe 10g per half hourish) during the race and don't worry about it. -as a fat-adapted athlete you will be insulin sensitive enough to not have to worry about haulting fat burning...

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  4. I will have a post with every detail of how I run the 50k this weekend. Look for my post next Thursday for a full answer to your questions.
    The cliffnotes version is this: make sure to hit 50 grams of carb the day before (or for marathon and 50k you can actually do a mini carb load if using Vespa), then eat a small and safe breakfast with some protein and MCTs more than an hour and a half before the race. Hit some Vespa 40 mins out. Then carb as desired in small doses (maybe 10g per half hourish) during the race and don't worry about it. -as a fat-adapted athlete you will be insulin sensitive enough to not have to worry about haulting fat burning...

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Anthony. I am looking forward to your 50k post.

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  5. I guess it is all perspective too . . . Are we talking about finishing? Or hitting the podium? There is definitely a difference. When I was a mountaineer, I drilled holes in my spoon handle and had a spreadsheet with the weight of all the gear and exact measurements per day of all my food. Did it really make a difference? In bigger trips it sure did and I got it down to a science.

    I personally am new to running and every race I am trying to PR, I am very competitive mostly with myself. I have made a lot of mistakes and most have been nutritional. Ultimately it is your conditioning, right? With that said, I am constantly tweaking my diet and the more I read the more obsessed I get. Will I really see a difference between grass feed beef and not? But if what I ate really didn't make a difference, I still would be eating potato chips.

    It terms of eating during a really long run / race, I think it only comes with experience and what you are mentally comfortable with. I just recently removed my emergency gels from my running pack, but my first few months I kept them in there just in case. I know Eric and Anthony are both really trying to dial-it-in and making it a science. I am too, but am just at a very different place. And look at George, he has run over 17 ultras low-carb (ketosis?) – Damn! that is awesome! He has some major experience, but I would bet that his body functions a little bit differently than mine, particularly after his 10 years of runner and 1.5 years low-carbing. Could I fuel the same way as any of these guys? I don't know yet, but I am going to keep on experimenting. I know I am not going to eat 30 gels like I did in my last 50 miler.

    You guys rock! This is such a great discussion.

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